JAMA00

SCOM 2007 R2

What property is discovered?

Posted by MarcKlaver on May 17, 2011

I think we all used these Kevin Holman queries to handle the config churn in our environment. But what if you still have config churn issues, but don’t see any issues with these queries.

We still had config churn, but running the queries form Kevin Holman did not point us to the reason for those config churns. But we got some information with a support case.

First we can retrieve exact what is changed, using this query (run on against de data warehouse database):

use OperationsManagerDW
go

select * from dbo.ManagedEntityProperty
where DWCreatedDateTime > dateadd(hh,-24,getutcdate())
order by DWCreatedDateTime, ManagedEntityRowId

This will result in output similar to this:

image

It will give you all properties that are changed within the last 24 hours and what exactly is changed. Now when you “click” on a PropertyXML value or DeltaXml, a new windows will be opened showing you exact which properties there are and which are changed.

But now we don’t have any idea were to find this in a management pack, but we will get there. From the above output, take the ManagedEntityRowId and place this in the next query:

use OperationsManagerDW
go

select * from ManagedEntity
where ManagedEntityRowId = 121403

This will result in output similar to this:

image

The ManagedEntityGuid is what we need here. Place it in the next query (which will run against the operations database):

use OperationsManager
go

select * from BaseManagedEntity
where BaseManagedEntityId = ‘3B9F6E60-02B5-8369-859F-8047093CE33F

The result is:

image

The next thing we need is the BaseManagedTypeId

use OperationsManager
go
select * from ManagedType
where ManagedTYpeId = ‘10C1C7F7-BA0F-5F9B-C74A-79A891170934

Which results in:

image

Here you can find the TypeName that is discovered (Microsoft.SQLServer.Database in this case). Use the ManagementPackId to get the actual management pack:

Use OperationsManager
Go
Select * from ManagementPack where ManagementPackId = ‘BCD6DCCF-C46C-A1F5-3C8D-BB4E99E2A6A3

And the final result will be:

image

So we now know that the property is of type “Microsoft.SQLServer.Database” and that it is discovered in the “Microsoft.SQLServer.Library” management pack (aka “Microsoft SQL Server Core Library”).

Note that if you are only interested in the actual management pack name, you can also use this query (which uses the ManagedEntityGuid from the first query against the operations database):

use OperationsManager
Select * from ManagementPack
where ManagementPackId = (
    select ManagementPackId from ManagedType
    where ManagedTYpeId = (select BaseManagedTypeId from BaseManagedEntity
        where BaseManagedEntityId = ‘3B9F6E60-02B5-8369-859F-8047093CE33F
    )
)

This will result in the same output as the last screenshot (but now you don’t know the type for the data). When you have this information, you can look up the corresponding discoveries so you can fine tune them if required.

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